Duhamel Watershed Society

Duhamel Watershed Society

Locals have fished at the Meadows in Duhamel Creek for many generations photo credit - Duhamel Watershed Society

Locals have fished at the Meadows in Duhamel Creek for many generations
photo credit – Duhamel Watershed Society

In 2013, the Duhamel Watershed Society (DWS) was formed by a group of local citizens who were concerned about the future protection of their watershed due to recent accelerated logging activity there.

Here you can take a look at a factsheet, a 2014 brochure and a photo gallery of images.

For more information see the DWS website:

http://www.duhamelwatershedsociety.com/

Weekly water monitoring in during spring run-off. Bi-weekly during summer months. photo credit - Duhamel Watershed Society

Weekly water monitoring in during spring run-off. Bi-weekly during summer months.
photo credit – Duhamel Watershed Society

Water monitoring consists of water and air temperatures and water sample collecting Duhamel Watershed Society

Water monitoring consists of water and air temperatures and water sample collecting
Duhamel Watershed Society

Duhamel Creek Watershed Fact Sheet

  • Duhamel Watershed Society (DWS) is a registered non-profit society who’s mandate is to help ensure that our watershed remain a fully-functioning ecosystem. That is to say that all of its parts, flora, fauna, soil, water, microorganisms, etc. , remain healthy and intact, functioning in an interdependent and holistic way.
  • The work of DWS includes:
  1. Employing the services of local Professional Forester, John Cathro and local Professional Hydrologist, Doctor Martin Carver, to consult with Kalesnikoff Lumber on how to log in the Duhamel watershed in the most ecologically sensitive way.
  2. Monitoring the water quality and flow of Duhamel Creek over the long term to determine any adverse affects related to logging.
  3. Educating the residents in the Duhamel Creek watershed and beyond on the issues related to our watershed.
  4. Organizing interesting and informative educational tours in the Duhamel Creek watershed to inform people of the critical role it plays in our lives.

    Sunrise in Duhamel Watershed photo credit - Randi Jensen

    Sunrise in Duhamel Watershed
    photo credit – Randi Jensen

  5. Networking with other watershed groups to promote awareness of and protection of watersheds everywhere.
  • The government of British Columbia has shifted its responsibility for ensuring the sustainable use of forest resources to the forest license holders (logging companies).   Much of the legislation that was designed to safeguard forests has been scrapped. By and large, companies now regulate themselves. Economics now trump every other matter related to forests, i.e. maintaining forest structure and function.
  • Watershed groups, like DWS, are more important than ever now, because they have become the watchdogs and advocates for responsible forest use.   Without them there is no one to try to prevent our watersheds from being compromised.
  • Logging can:
  1. Disturb the water quality and flow in watersheds due to the removal of large areas of forests that act as water flow regulators and water purifiers. Landslides into major waterways can alter the course of these waterways, causing structural damage and threatening homes and people along the way.

    Winter in the Duhamel Watershed 2014 photo credit - Randi Jensen

    Winter in the Duhamel Watershed 2014
    photo credit – Randi Jensen

  2. Compromise the complexity and healthy functioning of forests through the removal of large parts of a forest ecosystem over time.   The forest no longer has the species diversity (flora and fauna) nor the functioning complexity that it once had. Old growth forests literally function as the lungs of the planet, storing vast amounts of carbon dioxide and constantly replenishing the oxygen that we breathe.
  3. Leave future generations less well off as a result of the removal of this resource over a short period of time.
Logging site seen from east side of creek on Heddle Road photo credit - Randi Jensen

Logging site seen from east side of creek on Heddle Road
photo credit – Randi Jensen

Recent slides occurred in 1997, 2011 and 2014

Large flood occurred in 1957

 

 

 

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